Are you a medical professional looking to volunteer in Nepal?

There are still places for the medical camp this summer if you are interested? We need to recruit a min of 6 medical staff to work alongside our Nepali team so if you have the skills and are coming to Nepal then please read the information below and get in touch. 

EHN Nepal requires volunteers with medical experience to help run med camps in villages in Nepal. We have seen many clinics built but not used by the locals as they either don’t have the time or can’t walk down to the centre and therefore go untreated. This coupled with the lack of good health care practices mean rural Nepali’s have little or no health care that they can use or trust locally. EHN wants to be able to offer these rural communities better health care for free. We can only achieve this with the help of volunteers and sponsors.

Welcoming a new volunteer to the medical team

EHN has run several med camps over the last few years with the average group consisting of 4 to 10 volunteers. The projects normally last 5 to 7 days max including one day off a week plus travel days. The volunteers will always be accompanied by qualified Nepali medical staff including at least one Nepali doctor. We also use Nepali students from Kathmandu to help with translation between the volunteers and locals to help with research and diagnosis. In most cases the med camps are run from local schools using one or two classrooms if the community does not have a specific building for community events.
EHN is looking to run two or three free med camps every summer in July and August so if you have a back ground in medicine or wish to move into that field this may be the project for you.
If you are interested in helping in an EHN med camp please email Phil Palmer at

phil@ehn-nepal.org

Still places for the medical camp this summer in Nepal if your interested?

There are still places for the medical camp this summer if you are interested? We need to recruit a min of 6 medical staff to work alongside our Nepali team so if you have the skills and are coming to Nepal then please read the information below and get in touch. 

EHN Nepal requires volunteers with medical experience to help run med camps in villages in Nepal. We have seen many clinics built but not used by the locals as they either don’t have the time or can’t walk down to the centre and therefore go untreated. This coupled with the lack of good health care practices mean rural Nepali’s have little or no health care that they can use or trust locally. EHN wants to be able to offer these rural communities better health care for free. We can only achieve this with the help of volunteers and sponsors.

Welcoming a new volunteer to the medical team

EHN has run several med camps over the last few years with the average group consisting of 4 to 10 volunteers. The projects normally last 5 to 7 days max including one day off a week plus travel days. The volunteers will always be accompanied by qualified Nepali medical staff including at least one Nepali doctor. We also use Nepali students from Kathmandu to help with translation between the volunteers and locals to help with research and diagnosis. In most cases the med camps are run from local schools using one or two classrooms if the community does not have a specific building for community events.
EHN is looking to run two or three free med camps every summer in July and August so if you have a back ground in medicine or wish to move into that field this may be the project for you.
If you are interested in helping in an EHN med camp please email Phil Palmer at

phil@ehn-nepal.org

Volunteer teachers required in Nepal

We are looking for volunteers to teach English in two rural schools outside of Pokhara, this project is close to the Annapurna range and next to lakes Begnas and Rupa.  We require volunteers for a minimum of one month who have a high level of written and spoken English. You will support the Nepali staff and take English lessons of all ages on a 6 day week. In most schools Friday is a half day but please expect at least one or two religious holidays during your time volunteering.  The level of teaching in most Government schools in Nepal is low and they seldom get the chance to practice spoken English, just copy from books.  

The volunteers will stay with a local family in the village the school is located living and eating as the family do. This will give the volunteer a chance to live life as a local while helping that community’s level of education in their Government school.  The volunteers will take lessons in English using the schools text books to teach but we would welcome new ideas if you have any?  The children age from Kindergarten to 16yrs old with a slightly higher number of boys in most classes.

This project is not available from Mid March to Mid or Mid June to Mid July due to schools holidays. The schools will also be shut from the end of Sep for two weeks for the Dashian festival which is the biggest celebration in the Nepali calendar.

Most of the villagers are of mixed caste and background but nearly all live off the land they own and have little option other than to send their children to the free government school in their area. EHN believes that by improving the level of spoken English in rural area’s it will give young adults from those schools more employment opportunities later in life.  Most of the money coming into Nepal comes from either aid agencies like EHN or tourism, anyone looking to work in the tourist industry has to speak English.

The Way EHN work

EHN charge £12 or $18 per day plus an £80 or $120 admin.  About a third of the money you pay goes to the home stay you’ll be living with. The remainder is split between EHN and the project with EHN normally only retaining 20%. All you need is enough to cover luxuries such as beer, chocolate, internet, laundry and some souvenirs. Everything else is covered by EHN including your airport pickup and drop off and a city tour.  In the case of this project EHN will be discussing with the hospital community board how best to use money as they need equipment, another fulltime Doctor and an Ambulance at present with a new hospital being built.

If you want to find out more about this position please contact EHN through this link

Application Form

 

Volunteers needed for a Free Rural Health Clinic in Nepal…

EHN Nepal requires volunteers with medical experience to help run med camps in villages in Nepal. We have seen many clinics built but not used by the locals as they either don’t have the time or can’t walk down to the centre and therefore go untreated. This coupled with the lack of good health care practices mean rural Nepali’s have little or no health care that they can use or trust locally. EHN wants to be able to offer these rural communities better health care for free. We can only achieve this with the help of volunteers and sponsors. 

EHN has run several med camps over the last few years with the average group consisting of 4 to 10 volunteers. The projects normally last 5 to 7 days max including one day off a week plus travel days. The volunteers will always be accompanied by qualified Nepali medical staff including at least one Nepali doctor. We also use Nepali students from Kathmandu to help with translation between the volunteers and locals to help with research and diagnosis. In most cases the med camps are run from local schools using one or two classrooms if the community does not have a specific building for community events.
EHN is looking to run two or three free med camps every summer in July and August so if you have a back ground in medicine or wish to move into that field this may be the project for you.
If you are interested in helping in an EHN med camp

Please email Phil Palmer at phil@ehn-nepal.org

 

We are looking for volunteers to help look after 10 to 15 disabled children in Kathmandu helping with daily chores such as studying, fun, games and some basic physiotherapy through games and sport.

As a volunteer your duties will be to welcome the children in everyday to play music and games to help with them learn and develop. You will also be required to help clean the home and children, prepare and serve lunch. On some days the children will watch a DVD and on others they may play volleyball or catch in the garden. Allot will depend on the time of year and weather. This position is a full time project meaning volunteers will help 6 days a week with Saturdays off but you will have time off during the day to use internet or do laundry. You are also only about a 15 minute from Boudha the biggest Buddhist stupa in Nepal and about 30 to 40 minutes’ walk from Pashupati the main Hindu temple of Nepal. This is a great place to experience Buddhism up close, either meeting monks in the streets or just relaxing in a local cafe to the sound of Buddhist prayers and horns. The area of Boudha has a thriving tourist industry so you will find plenty of cafes, shops and restaurants plus ATMS if you need to get money.

This project is closed for two weeks at the end of May every year so the staff can take a break plus the home will be close during Dashain and Tihar the two major festivals in Nepal. These religious festivals run by lunar cycles so the dates change every year. However these festivals are always somewhere from Late Sep to Mid Nov.

EHN requires volunteers who are happy to volunteer for a minimum of 1 month for this placement only. We feel this will give you and the children longer to build a bond plus it will give you time to have a greater effect.

For more information regarding this project please contact us on the email address below.

The Way EHN work

EHN charge’s £12 or $18 per day plus an £80 or $120.  We pay about 70% (depending on the exchange rate) of your money directly to the home with the rest going towards the running of EHN. The fee doesn’t cover luxuries such as beer, chocolate, internet, laundry and some souvenirs. Everything else is covered by EHN including your airport pickup and drop off and a city tour as part of admin fee payment.  In the case of this project EHN has already used an additional $2500 for two new roofs and relining the well for safe water. So even with the 25 to 30% EHN retains we still look to use any extra funds to support the relevant project.

Full payment is due at least one week before arriving in Nepal, either on the EHN website or direct to EHN UK in London.

Should you cancel during your agreed duration of volunteering EHN cannot offer you a refund as your fee is a donation to the project and EHN.

If you want to find out more about this position please contact EHN on the email address below.

phil@ehn-nepal.org

www.ehn-nepal.org

Volunteers needed for a Free Rural Health Clinic in Nepal…

We are going to be posting our most urgent volunteer positions on our blog from now on so people can see the upcoming projects easier.  At present we are looking for medical professionals please see below.
 
EHN Nepal requires volunteers with medical experience to help run med camps in villages in Nepal. We have seen many clinics built but not used by the locals as they either don’t have the time or can’t walk down to the centre and therefore go untreated. This coupled with the lack of good health care practices mean rural Nepali’s have little or no health care that they can use or trust locally. EHN wants to be able to offer these rural communities better health care for free. We can only achieve this with the help of volunteers and sponsors.
EHN has run several med camps over the last few years with the average group consisting of 4 to 10 volunteers. The projects normally last 5 to 7 days max including one day off a week plus travel days. The volunteers will always be accompanied by qualified Nepali medical staff including at least one Nepali doctor. We also use Nepali students from Kathmandu to help with translation between the volunteers and locals to help with research and diagnosis. In most cases the med camps are run from local schools using one or two classrooms if the community does not have a specific building for community events.
EHN is looking to run two or three free med camps every summer in July and August so if you have a back ground in medicine or wish to move into that field this may be the project for you.
If you are interested in helping in an EHN med camp
please email Phil Palmer at phil@ehn-nepal.org

What has EHN achieved Part 2

From the remaining 50% of the volunteers around 35% to 40% are medical which again splits into two basic sections.
The first is placing medical students in either of the two Government hospitals that we work with where they work alongside Nepali staff to learn about health care in Nepal. This is more of a sort term internship than volunteering to be fair but $250 of the volunteer fee goes directly to the hospitals. With WRH in Pokhara this is used by the hospital board for improvements and new equipment which is sorely needed. With Kanti children’s hospital $200 goes directly to the Oncology department to be used for free treatment of cancer on children. The families go through a process at the start to assess their means and the ones with little or no money have free cancer treatment paid for from these fees.
The second medical projects are the free health camps that we run a few times a year in various rural locations. So far we have run 6 free health camps for an average of 6 days per camp. We have a registration and triage section, then Doctors for diagnosing and treating and the last section is the Pharmacy where we hand out free medicines. On average we see 100 plus people per day on the med camps so would have checked, treated and given free medicines to over 4000 people in different districts of Nepal.

The remaining volunteers have helped plant 5000 trees plus volunteered on local farms helping and learning about local farming techniques in Nepal. These two projects have now been phased out as many of the farmers still do not have homes after losing them in the earthquake of 2015 and therefore cannot take volunteers in a home stay. The tree planting was stopped as we felt after the earthquake we needed to focus more on the rebuilding of Nepal rather than the environment plus it was outside of the EHN focus of Education and Health.

The main focus of all the volunteers EHN takes is to work with and support local people in offering a better service to their communities.

So far with the help and fees paid by our volunteers we have managed to run 6 free health camps in 6 different rural areas of Nepal proving free health checks and treatment to over 4000 people.

Supported two Government schools containing around 150 students in giving some 8100 hours of lessons to improve the level of English and also increase the number of new students enrolling.

Volunteers have painted two schools inside and out to help protect the building and give the school a brighter look.

Provided both schools with solar panels and batteries to provide the computers with constant power plus various pieces of equipment from books and pens to water filters and first aid kits.

EHN Volunteers have given 8100 hours plus of disabled child care and support.

Planted some 5000 trees to reforest an area close to Chitwan national park while teaching 15 lessons on the environment and the effects of plastic on the waterways and land.

Provided emergency repair work to the disabled day care when the building was badly damaged in the earthquake.

Handed out food and basic shelter to over 2000 people in 3 different locations in the weeks that followed the earthquake. Mostly tarpaulin sheets, rice, dhal, salt, sugar, tea, soap and other basics amounting to over $7000.

Rebuilt 4 homes and livestock buildings in two villages that where devastated by the earthquake.

Rebuilt one 8 classroom earthquake resistant school that was completely destroyed in the earthquake which will open this April after the painting have finished.

Provided further education to 4 girls after they left school by paying their University fees.

Paid for a new toilet block to be built in Rupa School.

Provided a water pump to an Orphanage in Kathmandu.

Helped 7 Nepali students obtain scholarships and placements in Universities in the US, UK and Australia.

Handed out over 10 boxes of toys, clothes and stationary to three different Orphanages.

Provided $1000 worth of tin sheets for Gorkha school to build temporary classrooms.

What has EHN achieved so far in part 1.

Education and Health Nepal is a fully registered Nepali and UK charity operating strictly in the fields of Education and Health services.

We founded EHN Nepal in 2013 and EHN UK in 2015 with two founders and several board members in each NGO. To date EHN has taken nearly 300 volunteers to help and support various schools, hospitals and project in Nepal. Most of the projects we work with are based in rural locations as we feel these are the area’s that need the most improvement and support.

From the 300 volunteers we have placed around 50% in education and around 35% in medical based projects with the remaining percentage either doing rural farming or a tree planting project we ran in 2014. With the education volunteers they split into two groups, the first is Government school education where volunteers work with the Nepali teachers and staff to help improve the level of spoken and written English and more recently computer studies. The second project that education volunteers help with is the day to day running of the disabled day care facility in Kathmandu.

Most volunteers stay for one month and would take an average of 5 or 6 45 minute lessons a day for 6 days a week. In most cases the volunteer teacher will work alongside a local teacher for the first few days before taking their own lessons. The disabled day care volunteers work the same  day week but will only take 2 or three lessons a day with the rest of the time spent playing, cleaning, cooking or taking the children out for a walk and a little exercise. 

This means over the last 4 years EHN education volunteers have provided some 8100 hrs plus of lessons and another 8100hrs of disabled child care.

The effects on the Schools has been the easiest to notice with students getting higher and higher English pass marks.  The two main schools we work with have both seen the average English pass mark rise from 70% to 82 to 84%. We have also seen a big increase in the confidence of children especially the girls. In Nepal woman are still very much second class citizens and will go without so much to make sure the men in their families get what they want. This also extends to education so in many cases daughters will not be offered the same educational opportunities as their brothers which is why helping to improve their confidence really helps them later in life if they don’t want to marry and want to pursue a career. The other noticeable effect EHN has had on both schools in the number of new students enrolling. The Government of Nepal started assessing all schools in Nepal two years ago with the idea of closing the ones that were not needed. The way they assessed this was based on new student numbers which for many Government schools was dropping due to the increase in private schools opening that charge a fee to all students. This meant that many Gov schools will be closed leaving the local community with no choice but to pay or not send their children to school. With the poorer people of Nepal and many of the girls only getting an education because it was free this meant many would not be able to get an education.  With Rupa and Damagde School EHN has seen an increase in student numbers due to the regular number of western volunteer teachers attending the schools. Rupa use to get around 20 students a year but before we started with them they were down to just 10 but just had 19 new students enrol. Damgade has been even better and was also down to 10 or less per year but have just enrolled some 30 new students.

We will be looking to work more on the computing side of education in the coming years while maintaining the volume English teaching volunteers.

With the Disabled day care we put volunteers in to help the staff run the center plus look after the children. This project is more about child care than education but volunteers are still asked to help with eye hand coordination exercises, arts and craft work and with the older ones some basic English and maths. Most families in Nepal do not get any support if they have a disabled child and therefore still need to work so having a safe place for their children to ply and develop is vital service allowing them to work and earn money.

Volunteers from Hong Kong

At the end of May EHN received 18 volunteers from the Hong Kong who were here to teach and paint classrooms at Damgade School. The team arrived late on the 25th and set off with Phil and 4 members of Brother Nepal a Nepali group looking to work with us. We arrived late afternoon on the 26th and started lessons on the 27th. The HK team had prepared so lessons for the various age groups and split themselves up into smaller teaching groups. The young ones had more simplified lessons teaching colours, numbers and letters while the older students had task such as short life stories which they had to read out and grammar tests. On the Saturday when the school was closed the team painted two of the classrooms plus spent some time exploring the local area. The last two days where the most fun for me as the team had brought along some arts and crafts lesson plans and equipment with one class designing their own school bags. The last day at school the teams held team building events for their respective classes with prizes going to the best team. One of the tasks was for the team to make a paper caterpillar track and then race each other without braking the paper track. It sounds easy but to get 6 pupils to all move at the same speed is harder than you think and was a great exercise in working as a team. We finished the day with a wonderful leaving ceremony where some of the students performed traditional Nepali dances for the team before giving them a Tika and Malla which are the red dot on the forehead and flower garland to show their love and respect for the team. We had many tears that day which to be honest was both wonderful and sad. When I see the volunteers cry as they do not wish to leave I know a piece of their heart will always belong to Nepal which fills me with joy but I hate seeing those sad faces when it’s time to say farewell.

The team then spent half a day and night in Pokhara lakeside to have a look round and do some shopping before heading back to KTM early on the 2nd of June. The 3rd of June we took them to see Patan Durbar Sq and Swayambhu before heading back to the hotel to get ready for their flight home.

I have to be honest and say I choked back a few tears myself that day as many of the group made a point of telling how much they had enjoyed Nepal and EHN and would try to make it back to see soon.

To all the Hong Kong group, Thank you for being so involved with your respective home stays and students and for being wonderful human beings. We hope to see back in Nepal for the schools 60th anniversary in 2017.

 

Updates from Nepal

EHN is looking at a productive 2016 so far with 8 volunteers now booked for the July medical camp and 3 volunteers going to paint Damgade School in Kaski. We have raised most of the money we need to rebuild the school in Gorkha and have recently met with a trust based in Nepal who manage construction projects. Since meeting with them we have sent information about the school and local supplies in order to recycle some of the materials used in the old school and reduce the cost to build. We are also able to take some volunteers to help with the construction of the school again to reduce the cost to build so if you or a friend are thinking of coming to help Nepal rebuild why not work with EHN and get some school children back in a safe earthquake proof school?

In the end we have had to look at working with a local construction trust to get the school built as paperwork and red tape at the Government level is proving to be very time consuming with little information as to when or if we can build. The trust has built over 100 schools and health posts in Nepal over the last 22 years and have far more experience at dealing with local and national Government officials which is why EHN has chosen to work with them.

We plan to construct the foundations and ground level before the monsoon rains get to heavy in June and then finish the second floor after the monsoon ends late Sep to early Oct. Once we have the new school block of 8 classrooms built we focus on getting a new day care room and storage room built as the existing building is badly damaged and only still standing as the school needs somewhere to store old furniture and supplies.

One other type of project that has been put in place but will not be launched until later this year is charity trekking to help raise the rest of the money needed to finish the school plus we hope start raising more for the next school we want to help rebuild. The way it works is pretty simple, EHN is a fully registered Nepali and UK charity which means if you wish to do a charity trek in Nepal you can use either of the two charities registration details to set up a fund raising site, bank account or online account. Once you have raised over £300 you have the minimum amount required to donate to the school rebuilding project. If you raise more you have the choice of donating it or using it to subsidise your trek or maybe split the extra amount? The choice is yours.  The trek will be booked with Himalayan Adrenaline Rush a new adventure travel company who will add 10% of the value of your trek to the donated amount so if you do the Everest base camp trek at £950 HAR will give back £95 to add to your donation increasing the amount of support you give.

There is no limit to how much you can raise and in theory if you raised over £1400 you could trek for free and still donate £500 when you combine your donation with the 10% kickback.

So that is what we have been doing and discussing in Feb and I will blog again soon.

EHN Nepal